[community] Is COVID Alert an Inclusive Design Fail?

Cybele S cybele.sack at gmail.com
Wed Aug 19 02:30:12 UTC 2020


+1 Pina

On Tue, Aug 18, 2020 at 4:36 PM <pina.dintino at gmail.com> wrote:

> I have been following this discussion with great interest. The one  point
> that seems to  be missing from this discussion is the one that we cannot
> simply include diverse people to do what we think they want to do or only
> have the choice to do in an attempt to be  diverse and inclusive. Let me
> clarify, too many people with disabilities are hired to work on inclusion
> or disability related work. PWDs for instance have much more to offer than
> simply testing or being part of a design team.  We are now seeing lots of
> movement on racism and the black lives matter. Again recognizing diversity
> is ensuring that everyone is treated with the same respect, is offered the
> same opportunities to do all that they dream of and not put them in
> position of continuously debating the why we deserve this or that. If we
> are truly inclusive, inclusive design is a great start, but it will only be
> sustained if we have diverse people as clients, as teachers, developers,
> economists, professional players in all sports, politicians, etc. It is
> only when we include the marginalized and the underserved in a way that
> helps build trust , value, and build the solutions they can use today,
> right now and not only aspire to use.
> Thanks for all your insightful thoughts.
> Pina
> ,
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: community <community-bounces at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca> On Behalf of
> Ather Shabbar
> Sent: August 10, 2020 1:15 PM
> To: Ushnish Sengupta <ushnish.sengupta at gmail.com>
> Cc: Inclusive Design Community <community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca>
> Subject: Re: [community] Is COVID Alert an Inclusive Design Fail?
>
> Hi Ushnish,
>
> Thanks for pointing us toward Scott Page's work on identity diversity and
> how it correlates to cognitive diversity. After all, an individual's
> perspective is shaped by their identity (gender, race, disability and other
> dimensions of diversity) which also shapes our experiences,  It is
> diversity of thoughts, or cognitive diversity, that is what we are looking
> for in a co-design project.  I look forward to learning more about Scott
> Page's work on expanded notions of diverse perspectives to encompass the
> perspectives that come from experience of barriers.
>
> I will go back to my point about organizational culture.  It has been said
> that "culture eats strategy", and if we don't shape the culture, we will
> not tap into the value that diversity brings to designing inclusive
> solutions. I would argue that organizational culture can be influenced and
> shaped by inclusive design. First recruiting qualified individuals who
> bring their unique talents and perspectives into the organization,  and
> secondly, to value the differences people bring to the organization. There
> are many ways valuing diversity can be institutionalized. I will focus on
> design or project teams in an organization.
>
> One of the ways organizations can value, recognize, respect  people's
> difference is by selecting a diverse design/project teams for projects.
> This starts the cycle of inclusion and beginning of culture change; i.e.,
> individuals from diverse groups are given opportunities to showcase their
> talent and their perspectives lead to better and lasting designs/solutions.
> It illustrates that diversity is an asset to the organization, not just a
> diverse workforce  composition.
>
> The beauty of inclusive design is that it utilizes inclusive and
> transparent processes and tools in the projects. We don't need to train or
> teach people in a design session, however, it is critical to include people
> who are most underserved by the current program/app - those who are at the
> margin or outliers, Perspectives and experiences of those at the margins
> are the focus of design solutions and we end up  with designs that meet the
> needs of many more users including those at the centre of the starburst.
> This is what we call the "curb cut" effect where the design solutions end
> up being used by many more people; i.e., curb cut where sidewalk meets the
> road is used not only by wheelchair users but also people who are using
> baby strollers, people making delivery, etc.
>
> Another important feature of inclusive design is the use of deep diving
> into the experiences of those who are most underserved by the current
> program/app. We use tools and resources that create empathy among
> co-designers. There are tools and resources available on the Inclusive
> Design Research Centre https://guide.inclusivedesign.ca/.
>
> The design team develops prototypes of solutions that are designed to meet
> the needs of individuals who are currently underserved. We carry out a
> critical examination of experiences of edge cases / users at the edge of
> the starburst by developing user experience map, record their daily lives
> and isolate pain points where the current design fails the users. These
> prototypes are evaluated by more users to determine viability, feasibility
> and desirability.  Refinements are made based on evolution. It is the
> iterative cycle that results in a flexible and lasting solutions.
>
> The idea is to end up with an adaptable solution that can serve many more
> people. This may take a little longer, and may cost more, but the solutions
> have a greater chance of user acceptance and will be more economical  in
> the long run.
>
> One might notice this type of co-design session utilizes the three
> dimensions of inclusive design:
>
> 1. Recognize, respect, and design for human uniqueness and variability.
>
> 2. Use inclusive, open & transparent processes, and co-design with people
> who have a diversity of perspectives, including people that can’t use or
> have difficulty using the current designs.
>
> 3. Realize that you are designing in a complex adaptive system.
>  I hope I am not going off on a tangent too much. I would be happy to chat
> further if anyone is interested.
>
> Ather
>
> On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 2:24 PM Ushnish Sengupta <
> ushnish.sengupta at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Hi Ather
> > I am a fan of Scott Page's work as well.
> > To put a finer point on it, he says people on the team not only have
> > to look different but also have to THINK different, he calls this
> > "cognitive
> > diversity":
> >
> >    - Page, S. (2018). How Diversity Powers Team Performance (Interview).
> >    Knowledge at Wharton. Retrieved from:
> >    https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/great-teams-diversity/
> >    - Page, S. (2020). Just having people who look different isn't enough
> >    to create a diverse team.  LinkedIn.  Retrieved from:
> >
> > https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/just-having-people-who-look-different-i
> > snt-enough-create-scott-page/?published=t
> >
> >
> > So here is some food for thought for this group:
> > Companies and governments, and nonprofit organizations argue that it
> > is not possible to have every disability, or individuals with every
> > intersectional lived experience on all project teams, let alone a team
> > that is building an app for the entire population of an entire country
> Canada.
> > But in addition to having some diversity of representation on the
> > project term, is it possible to train and educate everyone on the team
> > to think differently, be inclusive in their design process as others
> > have pointed out?
> >
> > Is it possible to train/educate project teams to think differently
> > enough to be inclusive of groups who have very different lived
> > experiences from the team?
> > Or do you think it always requires all the diverse groups impacted to
> > be represented as team members on the project?
> >
> > My literal translation of "Nothing about us without us" is that people
> > with disabilities need to be actually represented as full fledged team
> > members (not just usability or accessibility test subjects) on every
> > project. And then how many ppl with different disabilities,
> > intersectional experiences do we include as full fledged members of a
> team?
> > I am all ears!
> >
> > Ushnish
> >
> > On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 1:23 PM Ather Shabbar <ather.shabbar at gmail.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> >> Hi John, thank you for initiating this conversation about the new
> >> Covid Alert app.
> >>
> >> Having worked in public service in Ontario and examining how other
> >> governments and private sectors, I find organizations develop
> >> solutions that are designed by so called "experts" to address a need
> >> without taking into account the needs of edge users or those at the
> >> margin of society. Rather than including the users most underserved
> >> by the program, programs are designed without participation of edge
> >> users - not adhering to the concept of "nothing for us without us".
> >>
> >> I agree with you, John, when you say it's about "culture".  Culture,
> >> according to Edgar Schien is what organizational values are espoused,
> >> and what are the assumptions people make.
> >>
> https://hbr.org/2014/12/how-to-tell-if-your-company-has-a-creative-culture#:~:text=Schein%20divided%20an%20organization's%20culture,%2C%20inside%20jokes%2C%20and%20mantras
> .
> >> I believe we cannot ignore these two important elements of
> >> organizational culture when we are designing an app, a program or
> policy.
> >>
> >> My experiences tell me that every organization acknowledges the
> >> essential need to innovate in order to survive. But, when the
> >> pressure is on and there is a need to get something done, the so
> >> called "experts" are called in to find the solution fast. Senior
> >> executives in organizations see the need to hire  people from diverse
> >> backgrounds so they reflect/mirror the group they are serving.
> >> Missing are the values and assumptions that people operate under.
> >> Thus, diversity of perspectives, that are available but rarely invited
> to participate in designing solutions.
> >>
> >> Scott Page, from U of Michigan, explains his research showing how
> >> diverse teams produce better, lasting outcomes than homogenous groups
> or experts.
> >> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wULRXoYThDc
> >>
> >> In order for diversity to thrive, people need to feel like they
> >> belong and their perspectives are valued. For anyone interested in
> >> learning how to work toward creating an inclusive culture, Barbara
> Mazur offers her study.
> >> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wULRXoYThDc
> >>
> >> This, I believe, is the root cause of the cycle of exclusion is the
> >> culture of the organization which, in this case, leads to the
> >> development of a Covid app that fails a significant portion of the
> society.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> On Thu, Aug 6, 2020 at 5:40 PM Jutta Treviranus
> >> <jtreviranus at ocadu.ca>
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >>> I forgot to mention that we address mismatches between the needs of
> >>> the individual and the product, service or environment. Inclusive
> >>> design addresses mismatches faced by all justice seeking groups. Our
> >>> definition
> >>> is: Inclusive Design considers the full range of human diversity
> >>> with respect to ability, language, culture, gender, age, and other
> >>> forms of human difference.
> >>>
> >>> Jutta
> >>>
> >>> > On Aug 6, 2020, at 5:26 PM, Jutta Treviranus
> >>> > <jtreviranus at ocadu.ca>
> >>> wrote:
> >>> >
> >>> > Hi Ushnish,
> >>> > Inclusive Design grows out of Universal Design. Two different
> >>> > versions
> >>> emerged almost simultaneously, one in the UK and the version we
> >>> developed in our centre since 1993 here in Canada. The UK version
> >>> emerged as a "more realistic" approach to Universal Design (UD). It
> >>> framed UD for business and calculated the customer base for
> >>> accessibility features based on incidences of specific disabilities.
> See:
> >>> https://www-edc.eng.cam.ac.uk/downloads/idtoolkit.pdf . The UK
> >>> inclusive design grew out of architecture and industrial design.
> >>> They have since adopted many of our processes in the digital realm
> >>> and integrated this into Design for All in the EU.
> >>> >
> >>> > The IDRC version of Inclusive Design emerged in the context of
> >>> > digital
> >>> systems, networks and the Web. We saw the opportunity to move from
> >>> one-size-fits-all compromises of UD in architecture and industrial
> >>> design, to the opportunity to provide one-size-fits-one designs
> >>> within a digital system or network because of digital and network
> adaptability and sourcing.
> >>> We differ from the UK version of Inclusive Design in that we do not
> >>> stress incidence levels, in fact we stress the opposite and show the
> >>> systemic benefits of beginning with and co-designing with people
> >>> that are most marginalized.
> >>> >
> >>> > With respect to accessibility in the digital space, we were
> >>> > involved
> >>> in starting the Web Accessibility Initiative of the W3C together
> >>> with Mike Paciello and the Yuri Rubinsky Foundation. This is where
> >>> the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines were developed. They form
> >>> the basis of accessibility regulations relevant to the Web and other
> >>> digital tools in most countries with accessibility policies. The
> >>> original WCAG is in part based on our web accessibility guidelines.
> >>> When we developed the guidelines we did not think they would be
> >>> entrenched in laws as static criteria, because they do not encompass
> >>> all the needs, and because technology changes very rapidly. However,
> >>> regulations require testable requirements for enforcement.  We see
> >>> the accessibility laws as intended for the laggards who fail to see
> >>> the benefits of inclusive design. The original guidelines all
> >>> reflected guidance that would enable greater flexibility in Web
> interactions and content.
> >>> >
> >>> > The distinction that is made between accessibility and inclusive
> >>> design is that accessibility is the criteria, inclusive design is
> >>> the process. Juliana Rowsell and I are both Digital Fellows in the
> >>> Digital Academy. Her accessibility guidelines are a merger of a
> >>> number of sources of guidance.
> >>> >
> >>> > We have an inclusive design guide:
> >>> > https://guide.inclusivedesign.ca I have tried to capture our
> >>> > process in three blogs that are
> >>> non-technical and not too academic:
> >>> https://medium.com/fwd50/the-three-dimensions-of-inclusive-design-pa
> >>> rt-one-103cad1ffdc2
> >>> > There are three parts.
> >>> >
> >>> > Microsoft approached us to help them create an inclusive design
> >>> toolkit about 8 years ago, see
> >>> https://www.fastcompany.com/3054927/microsofts-inspiring-bet-on-a-ra
> >>> dical-new-type-of-design-thinking and https://vimeo.com/138671443.
> >>> The Toolkit is here:
> >>>
> https://download.microsoft.com/download/b/0/d/b0d4bf87-09ce-4417-8f28-d60703d672ed/inclusive_toolkit_manual_final.pdf
> .
> >>> Kat Holmes captured our inclusive design process and interpreted it
> >>> for private enterprise in her book Mismatch.  I worked with Matt May
> >>> to develop a set of courses in inclusive design for Adobe. See:
> >>> https://adobe.design/inclusive/ There are many other inclusive
> >>> design supports and resources emerging.
> >>> >
> >>> > The Canadian Digital Service is in part modelled on the on the
> >>> > Ontario
> >>> Digital Service led by Hilary Hartley. Here is an article they
> >>> published on the areas of inclusive design and accessibility:
> >>> >
> >>> https://medium.com/ontariodigital/if-you-want-the-best-design-ask-st
> >>> rangers-to-help-e37bdb73567
> >>> >
> >>> > I hope this clarifies. There are many more resources we can
> >>> > provide on
> >>> inclusive design.
> >>> >
> >>> > Jutta
> >>> >
> >>> >
> >>> > On Aug 6, 2020, at 3:59 PM, Ushnish Sengupta <
> >>> ushnish.sengupta at gmail.com<mailto:ushnish.sengupta at gmail.com>> wrote:
> >>> >
> >>> > CAUTION: This message was not sent directly from an OCAD U account.
> >>> There have been numerous confirmed COVID-19/Coronavirus phishing
> >>> exploits that may appear to originate from Government or other
> reputable sources.
> >>> Ensure that you trust this sender by confirming the actual sender
> >>> email address and do not click any links or open attachments in
> >>> suspicious messages. Forward any suspicious email to
> itsecurity at ocadu.ca<mailto:
> >>> itsecurity at ocadu.ca> for analysis.
> >>> >
> >>> > Thanks for clarifications Jutta
> >>> > I am definitely interested in learning more about Inclusive
> >>> > Design, so
> >>> any resources are welcome.
> >>> > I am able to find many more tools and practical examples for
> >>> > Design
> >>> Thinking due to the prevalence of the method. Design Thinking tools
> >>> and examples definitely need to be carefully selected according to
> >>> context, and critiqued in some cases.
> >>> > I would like to see more Inclusive Design related practical tools
> >>> > and
> >>> real world project examples for sure.
> >>> >
> >>> > I see a lot of overlap in descriptions of Inclusive Design and
> >>> > Design
> >>> for Accessibility, for example the makers of the Canadian Covi19
> >>> App, the Canadian Digital Service discusses accessibility and
> >>> inclusive services
> >>> here:
> >>> >
> >>> https://digital.canada.ca/2019/02/13/building-inclusive-services-is-
> >>> not-about-perfection/
> >>> >
> >>> > Perhaps anyone more familiar with the subject can shed some light
> >>> > on
> >>> the commonalities and differences between Inclusive Design and
> >>> Design for Accessibility.  IMHO I dont see design for accessibility
> >>> addressing the issues of socio-economic class, age differences, and
> >>> the digital divide, as made evident by the Canadian Covid19 App.
> >>> >
> >>> > Ushnish
> >>> >
> >>> >
> >>> > On Wed, Aug 5, 2020 at 2:17 PM Jutta Treviranus
> >>> > <jtreviranus at ocadu.ca
> >>> <mailto:jtreviranus at ocadu.ca>> wrote:
> >>> > Thank you Ushnish for the thoughtful approach.
> >>> >
> >>> > I wanted to add some considerations and clarifications.
> >>> >
> >>> > Two of the distinctions between Design Thinking and Inclusive
> >>> > Design,
> >>> as we conceive it at the IDRC, are 1) the logic model or process and
> >>> 2) the methods of considering the needs of the 'end user.”
> >>> >
> >>> > The difference is most striking in the process diagrams. Design
> >>> Thinking has the famous squiggle that iteratively results in a
> >>> winning design through a series of competitive processes,
> >>> https://thedesignsquiggle.com/. In Inclusive Design we use a
> >>> Virtuous Tornado which also iterates through full cycles that
> >>> include prototype evaluation, but rather than narrowing down to a
> >>> winning solution, we cycle out, in that we create a system that is
> >>> capable of stretching to address more and more needs in each
> >>> iteration.  See
> >>> https://guide.inclusivedesign.ca/activities/VirtuousTornado.html and
> >>> https://medium.com/@jutta.trevira/inclusive-design-the-bell-curve-th
> >>> e-starburst-and-the-virtuous-tornado-6094f797b1bf
> >>> >
> >>> > We have discovered that there is no fix, solution, winning or best
> >>> design when you are attempting to be inclusive. People with minority
> >>> needs always lose out when the process is competitive. The current
> >>> complex adaptive system we operate in also means that you need a
> >>> system that can respond and adapt. Hence encompassing more needs in
> >>> your system also supports greater flexibility in the underlying
> architecture.
> >>> >
> >>> > (As a side note, many Design Thinking initiatives (e.g., IDEO) and
> >>> Inclusive Design aim to "design for good". However, in Inclusive
> >>> Design we feel that for any design to survive it must be integrated
> >>> into standard mainstream practices or it won’t survive or
> >>> interoperate. Inclusive Design is not about charity but about
> >>> culture change for the benefit of the individuals currently excluded
> >>> and the system as a whole.)
> >>> >
> >>> > The second distinction is about how to and who to include in the
> >>> design process. We feel that it is most important to include people
> >>> who have difficulty or can’t use current designs. That is how we
> >>> innovate; and surface and address unexpected issues. I have found
> >>> that user research (especially statistical analysis that determines
> >>> an average), persona, and identity-based representation can lead to
> >>> a false notion of knowing what is needed or a false confidence. I
> >>> find that only by actively engaging people that have been excluded
> >>> by existing designs, or people that are most likely to be excluded
> >>> by the design you are working on, can you really understand the
> >>> spectrum of needs and how to address the needs  (designing with not
> >>> for, "nothing about us without us"). By active engagement of people
> >>> with lived experience of the barriers, I mean right from the
> >>> beginning, with the problem statement. There are many instances where
> our understanding of the problem has become deeper and more fundamental
> when we have done this.
> >>> >
> >>> > I’d love to explain further and I’d love your thoughts.
> >>> >
> >>> > thanks,
> >>> > Jutta
> >>> >
> >>> >> On Aug 4, 2020, at 7:08 PM, Ushnish Sengupta <
> >>> ushnish.sengupta at gmail.com<mailto:ushnish.sengupta at gmail.com>> wrote:
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Hi John
> >>> >> The primary data I know of answering some of the questions you
> >>> >> raised
> >>> is
> >>> >> Statistics Canada Internet Use surveys.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> I have been thinking about inclusion/exclusion and Contact
> >>> >> Tracing
> >>> Apps, so
> >>> >> a medium length response the original question "Is COVID Alert an
> >>> Inclusive
> >>> >> Design Fail?" follows.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> IMHO the project is an inclusive design failure on a number of
> levels:
> >>> >> 1) The first release failed to account for the spectrum of the
> >>> >> digital divide in terms of not everyone having the most recent
> phone and OS.
> >>> >> -Would be more transparent if they announced the plan or the
> >>> >> roadmap
> >>> to
> >>> >> address this issue, but no such plans/roadmap isv publicly
> >>> >> available
> >>> to my
> >>> >> knowledge
> >>> >> 2) The project failed to account for WHO would be excluded for
> >>> >> the
> >>> current
> >>> >> app as released, particularly senior citizens and low income
> >>> individuals,
> >>> >> not coincidentally the groups with disproportionally higher rates
> >>> >> of
> >>> >> Covid19 cases and deathsU
> >>> >> 3) Given that many accessibility technologies take time to "catch
> up"
> >>> to
> >>> >> the latest phone hardware and software releases, and additionally
> >>> given
> >>> >> that many senior citizens have disabilities, I would infer that
> >>> >> this
> >>> first
> >>> >> release of the contact tracing app discriminates against people
> >>> >> with disabilities, as a disproportionately LOW number of people
> >>> >> with disabilities will be able to effectively access, download
> >>> >> and use the
> >>> app,
> >>> >> exposing people with disabilities to greater Covid19 risks.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Solutions
> >>> >> 1) Design Thinking
> >>> >> Part of the solution is applying Design Thinking ensuring we
> >>> >> identify
> >>> the
> >>> >> appropriate stakeholders and user groups, create empathy maps,
> >>> >> ensure
> >>> each
> >>> >> different identified groups needs are met and follow through with
> >>> >> the
> >>> other
> >>> >> Design Thinking steps. I know there are many Design Thinking fans
> >>> >> on
> >>> this
> >>> >> list and within the groups that created the app, including
> >>> >> Ontario
> >>> Digital
> >>> >> Services, Shopify etc., and I am a fan of Design Thinking as
> >>> >> well,
> >>> but for
> >>> >> me Design Thinking is a *necessary but insufficient *process in
> >>> developing
> >>> >> a contact tracing app for a broad country wide population.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> 2) Cognitive diversity on Project Team I teach my Project
> >>> >> Management and Information Systems students, what
> >>> is
> >>> >> often missing in technology projects is the right mix of people
> >>> >> on the project team, to avoid what happened here.
> >>> >> If a government department or a private company or a combination
> >>> >> of
> >>> both
> >>> >> are designing an app for the ENTIRE Canadian population they need
> >>> >> to
> >>> have
> >>> >> people on the project team that have the COGNITIVE DIVERSITY to
> >>> understand
> >>> >> the following issues are relevant to the project:
> >>> >> 1) There is a phone technology based digital divide, its not a
> >>> >> binary have/have not issue, its a spectrum of access issue
> >>> >> including type of device, age of devices, operating system, cost
> etc.
> >>> >> In particular the digital divide involves low income and age
> >>> >> factors,
> >>> so at
> >>> >> a minimum the project team has to include people who can perform
> >>> >> a Socio-Economic Class and Ageism analysis.
> >>> >> 2). The Covid19 pandemic has disproportionately impacted senior
> >>> citizens in
> >>> >> long term care homes, as well as racialized low income
> >>> >> communities,
> >>> so any
> >>> >> technology implemented to combat the pandemic has to take this
> >>> >> disproportionality into account, and the technology selected,
> >>> designed, and
> >>> >> implemented has to be appropriate for these specific groups.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Unfortunately the demographic of the developers of Contact
> >>> >> Tracing
> >>> apps
> >>> >> tend not to match the demographics of those most negatively
> >>> >> affected
> >>> by
> >>> >> either Covid19 or the implementation of the app.  The developers
> >>> >> tend
> >>> to be
> >>> >> early adopters of technology having the latest phones, and have
> >>> limited
> >>> >> lived knowledge/experience of the digital divide. The app
> >>> >> developers
> >>> also
> >>> >> tend to be younger and have no lived experience of technology
> >>> >> access
> >>> issues
> >>> >> for senior citizens.  So is the solution just throw in a couple
> >>> >> of
> >>> people
> >>> >> with these specific lived experiences onto the project team?
> >>> >> Not necessarily, whats important is having team members be
> >>> >> cognizant
> >>> of,
> >>> >> and able to recognize the issues of the digital divide, agesim,
> >>> >> and
> >>> ableism
> >>> >> which comes often from lived experience, but also from training
> >>> >> and education on these frames of analysis, something that was
> >>> >> missing in
> >>> this
> >>> >> project.  We need to have people that can recognize these issues
> >>> >> on
> >>> the
> >>> >> project team from the start to avoid or mitigate them.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> p.s. I am going to write a coherent blog post out of this at some
> >>> point, so
> >>> >> comments including critiques are welcome.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Ushnish
> >>> >>
> >>> >> On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 6:28 PM John Willis
> >>> >> <pickupwillis at gmail.com
> >>> <mailto:pickupwillis at gmail.com>> wrote:
> >>> >>
> >>> >>> Thanks Roland, Michael., Justin for your great responses – this
> >>> >>> has enlightened me and I really appreciate it.
> >>> >>>
> >>> >>> Working in the area of social assistance and digital
> >>> >>> transformation,
> >>> there
> >>> >>> are a lot of assumptions being made in government about the
> >>> >>> spread of digital technology and its ubiquity in low income
> >>> >>> communities. While
> >>> it is
> >>> >>> obvious that in urban areas most people now have a smart phone,
> >>> >>> the variation in operating systems and how old they are, not to
> >>> >>> mention
> >>> the
> >>> >>> difficulty of Wi-Fi access in more rural areas, makes the
> >>> >>> situation
> >>> far
> >>> >>> more complicated
> >>> >>>
> >>> >>> Does anyone know of any quantitative analysis in Ontario or
> >>> >>> Canada
> >>> of low
> >>> >>> income families and individuals and their specific digital access?
> >>> >>>
> >>> >>> Thanks
> >>> >>>
> >>> >>> John D. Willis
> >>> >>> Design & innovation in Public Services
> >>> >>>
> >>> >>>
> >>> >>>> On Aug 4, 2020, at 17:21, Roland Van Oostveen <
> >>> >>> ROLAND.VANOOSTVEEN at uoit.ca<mailto:ROLAND.VANOOSTVEEN at uoit.ca>>
> >>> wrote:
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> When I heard this report I immediately thought that the failure
> >>> >>>> to
> >>> >>> install on older platforms might be due to the use of BlueTooth
> >>> technology
> >>> >>> (for security purposes) that allows the app to work in the first
> >>> place. If
> >>> >>> it could be installed on older mobile OSs but couldn’t do what
> >>> >>> it is supposed to, where would that get us. This is similar to
> >>> >>> the issues
> >>> that MS
> >>> >>> had with Windows and support for all of the older equipment.
> >>> Eventually
> >>> >>> even MS got to the point where obsolescence is built into the
> >>> >>> OS,
> >>> I.e.,
> >>> >>> nobody can run Windows95 anymore.
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> Roland
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> Roland van Oostveen
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> Director, BA in ESDT Programs
> >>> >>>> Associate Professor - Faculty of Education Ontario Tech
> >>> >>>> University
> >>> >>>> 905.721.8668 ext. 2657
> >>> >>>> 905.767.5993 (cell)
> >>> >>>> roland.vanoostveen at uoit.ca<mailto:roland.vanoostveen at uoit.ca
> >>> ><mailto:roland.vanOostveen at uoit.ca<mailto:roland.vanOostveen at uoit.c
> >>> >a>>
> >>> >>>> ontariotechu.ca<http://ontariotechu.ca/><http://ontariotechu.ca
> >>> >>>> <
> >>> http://ontariotechu.ca/>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> [Ontario Tech University logo]<https://ontariotechu.ca/>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> [Twitter icon]<https://twitter.com/rolandvo>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> [LinkedIn
> >>> >>>> icon]<https://linkedin.com/in/roland.vanoostveen@uoit.ca>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> Ontario Tech University is the brand name used to refer to the
> >>> >>> University of Ontario Institute of Technology.
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> The university is proud to acknowledge the lands and people of
> >>> >>>> the
> >>> >>> Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation which is covered
> >>> >>> under the Williams Treaties. We are situated on the Traditional
> >>> >>> Territory of
> >>> the
> >>> >>> Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation which
> >>> includes
> >>> >>> Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi.
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> From: John W (personal)<mailto:pickupwillis at gmail.com<mailto:
> >>> pickupwillis at gmail.com>>
> >>> >>>> Sent: August 4, 2020 4:39 PM
> >>> >>>> To: Inclusive Design
> >>> >>>> Community<mailto:community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca
> >>> <mailto:community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca>>
> >>> >>>> Subject: [community] Is COVID Alert an Inclusive Design Fail?
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> [EXTERNAL EMAIL]
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> the new Covid Alert app just released in Ontario apparently
> >>> >>>> requires
> >>> >>> users
> >>> >>>> to have the latest device / software, leaving low-income and
> >>> >>>> more marginalized folks -- aka people most likely to contract
> >>> >>>> the virus
> >>> -- out
> >>> >>>> of the loop.
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> I verified this myself yesterday when I could not install it to
> >>> >>>> my
> >>> >>> iPhone 6
> >>> >>>> because it requires iOS 13.5
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> WTF? is this an inclusive design fail of top ranking, or can
> >>> someone with
> >>> >>>> greater technical knowledge dismiss my budding outrage?
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> maybe it's just an MVP, okay - but surely the communication on
> >>> >>>> this
> >>> is
> >>> >>>> feeble and misguided because word is already out that it's for
> >>> >>>> the privileged few. Sheesh!
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> j
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> --
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> *John D. Willis | CE CAIP MDes* Design & Innovation in Public
> >>> >>>> Services Toronto CANADA
> >>> >>>>
> >>> >>>> Garbled text? My apologies - speech-to-text technology is still
> >>> >>>> a
> >>> work in
> >>> >>>> progress...
> >>> >>>> ________________________________________
> >>> >>>> Inclusive Design Community (community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca<mailto:
> >>> community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca>)
> >>> >>>> To manage your subscription, please visit:
> >>> >>> https://lists.idrc.ocadu.ca/mailman/listinfo/community
> >>> >>> ________________________________________
> >>> >>> Inclusive Design Community (community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca<mailto:
> >>> community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca>)
> >>> >>> To manage your subscription, please visit:
> >>> >>> https://lists.idrc.ocadu.ca/mailman/listinfo/community
> >>> >>>
> >>> >>
> >>> >>
> >>> >> --
> >>> >> ________________________________________
> >>> >> Inclusive Design Community (community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca<mailto:
> >>> community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca>)
> >>> >> To manage your subscription, please visit:
> >>> https://lists.idrc.ocadu.ca/mailman/listinfo/community
> >>> >
> >>> >
> >>> >
> >>> > --
> >>> > Recent Book Chapters:
> >>> > Monoculturalism, Aculturalism, and Postculturalism: The
> >>> > Exclusionary
> >>> Culture of Algorithmic Development<
> >>> https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3621779>
> >>> >
> >>> > Business Process Transformation in Natural Resources Development
> >>> > Using
> >>> Blockchain: Indigenous Entrepreneurship, Trustless Technology, and
> >>> Rebuilding Trust<https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783030443368>
> >>> >
> >>> > White Papers:
> >>> > Meeting Changing Customer Requirements in Food andAgriculture
> >>> > Through
> >>> Application of Blockchain Technology<
> >>> https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3429200>
> >>> >
> >>> > Business in the Front, Crypto in the Back: How to Be a Blockchain
> >>> Startup in Fintech<
> >>> https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3423179>
> >>> >
> >>> >
> >>> > Key Articles:
> >>> >
> >>> > The Future of Social Economy Leadership and Organizational
> >>> > Composition
> >>> in Canada: Demand from Demographics, and Difference through
> >>> Diversity< http://interventionseconomiques.revues.org/2794>
> >>> >
> >>> > Indigenous Cooperatives in Canada: The Complex Relationship
> >>> > Between
> >>> Cooperatives, Community Economic Development,Colonization, and
> >>> Culture<
> >>> http://www.jeodonline.com/sites/jeodonline.com/files/articles/2015/0
> >>> 8/13/6sengupta13aug2015.pdf
> >>> >
> >>> >
> >>> > Indigenous Communities and Social Enterprise in
> >>> > Canada:Incorporating
> >>> Culture as an Essential Ingredient of Entrepreneurship<
> >>> http://anserj.ca/anser/index.php/cjnser/article/view/196>
> >>> >
> >>> > ________________________________________
> >>> > Inclusive Design Community (community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca) To
> >>> > manage your subscription, please visit:
> >>> https://lists.idrc.ocadu.ca/mailman/listinfo/community
> >>>
> >>> ________________________________________
> >>> Inclusive Design Community (community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca) To manage
> >>> your subscription, please visit:
> >>> https://lists.idrc.ocadu.ca/mailman/listinfo/community
> >>>
> >>
> >
> > --
> > *Recent Book Chapters:*
> > Monoculturalism, Aculturalism, and Postculturalism: The Exclusionary
> > Culture of Algorithmic Development
> > <https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3621779>
> >
> > Business Process Transformation in Natural Resources Development Using
> > Blockchain: Indigenous Entrepreneurship, Trustless Technology, and
> > Rebuilding Trust <https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783030443368>
> >
> > *White Papers:*
> >
> > Meeting Changing Customer Requirements in Food andAgriculture Through
> > Application of Blockchain Technology
> > <https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3429200>
> >
> > Business in the Front, Crypto in the Back: How to Be a Blockchain
> > Startup in Fintech
> > <https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3423179>
> >
> >
> >
> > *Key Articles:*
> >
> > The Future of Social Economy Leadership and Organizational Composition
> > in
> > Canada: Demand from Demographics, and Difference through Diversity
> > <http://interventionseconomiques.revues.org/2794>
> >
> > Indigenous Cooperatives in Canada: The Complex Relationship Between
> > Cooperatives, Community Economic Development,Colonization, and Culture
> > <http://www.jeodonline.com/sites/jeodonline.com/files/articles/2015/08
> > /13/6sengupta13aug2015.pdf>
> >
> > Indigenous Communities and Social Enterprise in Canada:Incorporating
> > Culture as an Essential Ingredient of Entrepreneurship
> > <http://anserj.ca/anser/index.php/cjnser/article/view/196>
> >
> ________________________________________
> Inclusive Design Community (community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca) To manage your
> subscription, please visit:
> https://lists.idrc.ocadu.ca/mailman/listinfo/community
>
> ________________________________________
> Inclusive Design Community (community at lists.idrc.ocadu.ca)
> To manage your subscription, please visit:
> https://lists.idrc.ocadu.ca/mailman/listinfo/community
>


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