[community] Bluetooth DV track?

Jaime Enrique Cortés Fandiño cortesfandino at gmail.com
Fri Aug 16 22:56:53 UTC 2019


Hi,
from the problematic exposed by John, I have done a brief investigation and
there is not much. I also took this problem to my students and they have
been motivated to help resolve the issue.
Thanks John for the motivation.
I hope to have answers soon.

Jaime E.

El vie., 16 de ago. de 2019 17:30, John Willis <pickupwillis at gmail.com>
escribió:

> Thank you Charles, David, Thank you for this great conversation!
>
> David I think it would be great if you could reach out to the folks at
> accessible media and see what they know or have to say about it – surely
> they looked into this?
>
> Charles I love your workaround – totally in favour of an extra TV for
> every blind Canadian :-)
>
> It does work in the theater, I use that function all the time. I had not
> realized that the technology was not included in consumer electronics Dash
> that is a barrier but also seems quite an oversight. I wonder which
> technical standards would need to be modified to encourage uptake of this
> option by more manufacturers? I can look into that, as I am involved with
> ISO
>
> Let’s keep in touch fellas, and thanks again
>
> J
>
> John D. Willis
> Design & innovation in Public Services
>
>
> > On Aug 16, 2019, at 15:23, Charles Silverman <charlessilverman at me.com>
> wrote:
> >
> > Hi John and David,
> >
> > Strange that there’s been very little discussion about the limitations
> of home entertainment devices when it comes to watching descriptive video
> content. Sadly, today’s home equipment is not designed to output more than
> one audio selection from a video at the same time. This includes DVD
> players, Blue-ray players, OTA (over the air) TV, cable TV, satellite TV,
> along with smartphones, tablets,  and computers. Digital video streaming
> services like iTunes and Netflix that support DV, are designed to only
> output a single stream at a time.
> >
> > It’s either the main audio for everyone, or the description track* for
> everyone.
> >
> > On the other hand, movie theatres that have the right digital screening
> equipment are able to provide descriptive video over wireless headphones
> while the rest of the audience listens to the main audio track.
> >
> > One interesting, albeit unwieldy, low tech workaround, would be to use
> to two playback devices. TVs getting real time signal from over-the-air,
> cable, and satellite services might work well. You could use one set to
> access the audio description track, plugging a headset so that you’re the
> only one receiving the descriptions. The other TV would provide the main
> audio and video for everyone else.
> >
> > For physical media (DVD, etc) and internet streaming, the above solution
> may be hit-or-miss due to a syncing problem.
> >
> > For example, you could employ two DVD players, setting one player to the
> audio description track, and the other player to the main audio track.
> You'll need to simultaneously (or nearly so) press the play buttons of both
> players. It may take several tries to get it right (or not). If you get
> that far, you may have to forgo attempting to simultaneously press the
> pause buttons of each device for the duration of the video, e.g., no food
> and bathroom runs :) .
> >
> > Web streaming services like Netflix are another possibility, but in
> addition to getting the syncing right, internet bandwidth issues could make
> synchronizing impossible. If this could actually would, the potential
> useful part is that your smartphone could serve as the audio description
> device.
> >
> > I’m not recommending “human syncing”, but it could be an interesting
> experiment. I actually did something similar in the captioning realm with
> Netflix’s uncaptioned second season of Torchwood where I was able to
> download subtitles to these episodes from a large web repository of
> subtitles. Using Quicktime 7 and CapScribe, a caption editor, I was able to
> create a Quicktime movie from just the captions. The final step was to to
> manually sync the show with the caption video. For caption viewing I used
> an iPad just under the video. It’s obviously not a very practical solution
> and it is time consuming. Fortunately Netflix and iTunes have come a long
> way and most of their content is captioned today (with descriptions
> catching up).
> >
> > David … good idea reaching out to AMI. It would be also worth talking
> with the NCAM folks (NCAM is National Centre for Accessible Media, part of
> PBS’ Boston flagship station, WGBH). NCAM was the group that initially
> brought descriptive video to television (DVS) and movie theatres (MoPix).
> >
> >
> > -Charles
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >> On Aug 15, 2019, at 11:41 AM, David Berman <berman at davidberman.com>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Hi John,
> >> That makes perfect sense.
> >> To put a finer point on it,
> >> I think you want two things happening at once:
> >> 1 of 2: audio description user (e.g., John) hears the typical track +
> the
> >> audio description track on bluetooth headset, while...
> >> 2 of 2: typical users (e.g., rest of John's family) hears the typical
> track
> >> only, via the loudspeakers.
> >> I am not aware if this has been done, however I'm thinking our friends
> at
> >> AMI should know (and/or can "make it so").
> >> Would you like me to query them on it?
> >> Regards,
> >> David
> >>
> >>> On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 at 21:04, John Willis <pickupwillis at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Hi everyone, I’ve had this question on my mind for some time and
> thought
> >>> you might know the answer – has anyone yet invented away for the
> described
> >>> video from movies and television to be encapsulated it up Bluetooth
> stream?
> >>> So that the rest of my family did not listen to it?
> >>>
> >>> As a blind watcher, this seems very obvious to me, but surely others
> have
> >>> come up with this idea – has anyone created it?
> >>>
> >>> And if it already exists, any thoughts on why it’s not easily available
> >>> through standard smart TVs, and streaming services?
> >>>
> >>> John D. Willis
> >>> Design & innovation in Public Services
> >>>
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> >>
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